ABRC submitted talks

For the final program, please see http://bees.msu.edu/2012/abrc/

American Bee Research Conference

Organized by

The American Association of Professional Apiculturists

Hershey, Pennsylvania                               January 10-11, 2013

 

At this point only corrections will be received. Please use the numbers here to refer to your talk and with the subject line such as “ABRC #15 corrections” and email to bees@msu.edu.

 

Thank you,

Zachary Huang, updated,Nov 30th 2012.

 

 

  1. Plenary Presentation by Yve LeConte: Pheromones and Social Regulation.

 

The Foundation for the Preservation of Honey Bees Scholarship Awardees (6 talks)

 

2.      Using video-tracking as a risk assessment tool to evaluate the sublethal effects of pesticide exposure to the honey bee.  Erin Ingram, University of Nebraska, 3115 “E” Street, Lincoln, NE 68510

3.  Contributions of brood communication and mite-exposure to hygienic behavior in Apis mellifera. Kaira Wagoner, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 706 Northridge Street, Greensboro, NC.

4. Molecular, physiological and behavioral responses of honey bees (Apis mellifera) to Nosema infection.  Holly L. Holt. Pennsylvania State University, Department of Entomology, University Park, PA

5. Synergistic effects of pesticides, poor/rich pollen nutrition, diseases and temperature on honey bees. Simone Tosi, University of Bologna, via Zaniboni 15, Bologna, 40129, Italy

6.  Cell culture as a tool to improve our understanding of bee biology and diseases. Mike Goblirsch, University of Minnesota; Dept. of Entomology. Mike Goblirsch, 219 Hodson Hall; 1980 Folwell Ave., St. Paul, MN.

7. Effects of IAPV on foraging behavior of honeybee (Apis mellifera). Zhiguo Li, Bee Research Laboratory, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China .

 

Student competition (2 talks)

8. Urbanization, agricultural intensity, and urban-rural interface as predictors of hive productivity.  Douglas B. Sponsler and Reed M. Johnson. Department of Entomology, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH.

9. Honey bee caste acetylcholinesterase inhibition: Insights into coumaphos tolerance. Lizette Dahlgren, Ethan Siegfried, Reed Johnson, Blair Siegfried and Marion Ellis. Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, NE.

Regular talks

10.  Colony health implications of pollen and pesticide diversity in colonies rented for crop pollination. Elinor M. Lichtenberg1, Jeffery S. Pettis2, Michael Andree3, Jennie Stitzinger4, Robyn Rose4 and Dennis vanEngelsdorp1. 1) University of Maryland, College Park, Department of Entomology, 3136 Plant Sciences Building, College Park, MD, 2) USDA-ARS Bee Research Laboratory, Bldg. 476 BARC-E, Beltsville, MD 3) University of California, Cooperative Extension Butte County, 2279-B Del Oro Ave., Oroville, CA, 4) USDA-APHIS, 4700 River Rd., Riverdale, MD

11.  Small hive beetle (Aethina tumida) larval development in Hawaiian fruits and development of an SIT protocol. Danielle Downey1, Stacey Chun2, and Peter Follett3. 1) Hawaii Department of Agriculture/UH Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit 16 E. Lanikaula St. Hilo, HI, 2) Hawaii Department of Agriculture,16 E. Lanikaula St., Hilo, HI, 3)USDA-ARS, U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, 64 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI

12. Clothianidin exposure levels from bee-collected pollen and nectar in seed-treated corn and canola plantings. Colin B. Henderson, Colin B. Henderson1, Jerry J. Bromenshenk1 and David L. Fischer2. 1) Bee Alert Technology, Inc; Missoula, MT, 2) Bayer Crop Science, Research Triangle Park, NC.

13.  Preliminary results on the evaluation of different honey bees stocks for their susceptibility to Deformed Wing Virus. Kitiphong Khongphinitbunjong1, Lilia I. de Guzman2, Matthew R. Tarver2, Thomas E. Rinderer2, Yan Ping Chen3 and Panuwan Chantawannakul1,4. 1) Bee Protection Center, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2) USDA-ARS, Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory, 1157 Ben Hur Road, Baton Rouge, LA, 3) USDA-ARS, Bee Research Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, USA, 4) Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

14. Does the removal of Varroa-infested brood facilitate grooming? Lilia I. de Guzman1, Thomas E. Rinderer1, Amanda M. Frake1 and Maria J. Kirrane2. 1) USDA-ARS, Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory, 1157 Ben Hur Road, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, 2) School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES), University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

15.  Bacteria community structure in the midguts of A. dorsata workers in Thailand. Prakaimuk Saraithong1, Yihong Li2 and Panuwan Chantawannakul1,3. 1) Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2) Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, New York University, NY, 3) Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

16. Fine mapping VSH behavior with SNPs: a defined genetic interval and the causative genes. Beth Holloway1, Jeffrey Harris2, Jose Villa and Robert Danka1. 1) ARS-USDA, Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics & Physiology Research Unit, 2) Mississippi State University, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology.

17.  The formulation makes the bee poison. C.A. Mullin, J. Chen, W. Zhu, M.T. Frazier and J.L. Frazier. Department of Entomology, Center for Pollinator Research, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

18.  Examining the causes of differential responses to the queen by drones and workers. G. Villar, T. Baker, H. Patchand C.M. Grozinger. Department of Entomology, Pennsylvania State University, The Center for Pollinator Research, Chemical Ecology Lab – Room 101, University Park, PA.

19. Effects of pesticide exposure on pathogens and immunity in honey bee colonies. Brenna E. Traver. Department of Entomology, Virginia Tech, 501K Price Hall, Blacksburg, VA.

20.  Behavioral correlates and markers of oxidative stress in honey bees. Michael Simone-Finstrom, David Tarpy and Olav Rueppell. Department of Entomology, NC State University, Campus Box 7613, Raleigh, NC.

21.  Early development of Nosema ceranae in honey bee midgut tissue. Thomas C. Webster and Martin A. Matisoff.  College of Agriculture, Food Science and Sustainable Systems, Kentucky State University, Frankfort KY.

22.  Honey bee declines in Virginia: an assessment of pesticide exposures and colony health. Troy D. Anderson, Alison M. Reeves, Brenna E. Traver, Carlyle C. Brewster and Richard D. Fell. Department of Entomology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

23.  Effects of optimizing hive solar absorption on honey bee health and productivity. Michael P. Steinkampf, John C. Hurst and James E. Tew. 1) Sandhurst Bee Company, Mountain Brook, AL, 2) Rockhurst Farm, Birmingham, AL, 3) Auburn University, Auburn, AL.

24.  Quebec honey bee breeding program for increasing disease resistance and productivity.  Pierre Giovenazzo and Georges Martin. Centre de recherche en sciences animales de Deschambault, 120A chemin du Roy, Deschambault, Qué, Canada. 

25.  Final report for the Varroa mite RNAi project. Xianbing Xie1,2, Zachary Y Huang2, Guowei Bian2, Zhiyong Xi2. 1) Laboratory Animal Science Department, Nanchang University, China, 2) Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI

26.  Effect of Nosema ceranae on honey bee behavior and physiology. Meghan O. Milbrath1, X.B. Xie1,2 and Z.Y. Huang1. 1) Department of Entomology, 243 Natural Science, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI, 2) Laboratory Animal Science Department, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China.

27.  Proteomic marker-assisted selection in honey bees: Year 2 update from the Bee IPM Project. Stephen F. Pernal1, Abdullah Ibrahim1, Shelley E. Hoover2, Robert W. Currie3, Heather A. Higo4, Elizabeth Huxter5, M. Marta Guarna6 and Leonard J. Foster6. 1) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Beaverlodge Research Farm, P.O. Box 29, Beaverlodge, AB, Canada, 2) Alberta Food and Rural Development, Lethbridge Agriculture Centre, 100-5401 – 1 Ave South, Lethbridge, AB, Canada, 3)  Department of Entomology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, 4) 1077237A St. Langley, BC, Canada, 5) Kettle Valley Queens, Grand Forks, BC, Canada, 6) University of British Columbia, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Centre of High-Throughput Biology, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

28.  Toxic and repellent effects following a sublethal exposure to pyrethroids used in orchards on the honey bee, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera:  Apidae). Erin Ingram, Marion Ellis and Blair Siegfried. Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, NE.

29.  University of Minnesota Bee Squad, Jody Gerdts and Marla Spivak.  Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, 1980 Folwell Ave., 219 Hodson Hall, St. Paul, MN.

30. Parent-of-origin effects on gene expression in larval and adult honey bees. Hunt, G. J.1, S.D. Kocher2, J.M. Tsuruda1, C. Emore1, M.E. Arechavaleta-Velasco3, C. Robles-Rios3, C. Grozinger4, D.C. Queller5 and J. Strassman5 1). Purdue University, 901 West State St., West Lafayette IN, 2). Harvard University, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge MA, 3). Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP), Ajuchitlan, Qro. Mexico, 4). Pennsylvania State University, 501 ASI Building, University Park PA, 5). Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis MO

31.  The effects of the fungicide Pristine on queen rearing. Reed Johnson1 and Eric Percel2. 1). The Ohio State University, Department of Entomology, Wooster, OH, 2). The Ohio State University, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Columbus, OH.

32.  Cellular immune response to varroa mite infestation in European and Africanized honey bees.  Ernesto Guzman-Novoa1, Gun Koleoglu1, Mariana Reyes-Quintana2, Paul Goodwin1, and Mollah M. Hamiduzzaman1. 1). School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. 2) Departamento de Medicina y Zootecnia en Abejas, FMVZ, UNAM, Cd. Univ., Mexico DF, Mexico.

33.  Effect of fungicide (propiconazole) leaf and flower corolla residue exposure on honey bee colony health. Francis A. Drummond and Jennifer Lund. School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, ME.

34. The Rocky Mountain Survivor Queenbee Rearing Cooperative: High elevation chemical-free breeding paradigm and production protocol. Melanie M. Kirby1, Marygael Meister2, Janet Fink3, Kate Whealen4, Meg McGee5, Resa Sawyer6, Angela Lewis7, Moira O’Hanlon8. 1) Zia Queenbee Co., www.ziaqueenbees.com , www.RMSQBCoop.org P.O. Box 317 Truchas, NM. 2) DenverBee.Org, RMSQB Coop Secretary. 3) Spanish Peaks Bee Club Founder-Walsenburg, CO. 4) Sangre de Cristo Bee Club Founder-Santa Fe, NM. 5) Mora Valley Apiaries, RMSQB Co-Founder. 6) The Middle Aged Spread- Buena Vista, NM, RMSQB Co-Founder. 7) Arroyo Hondo- Taos, NM. 8) Arroyo Seco- Taos, NM, Taos Bee Club

35. Survey of Pollination Economics, 2012, Dewey M. Caron1 and Ramesh Sagili2, 1). Affiliate Faculty, Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, 2). Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.

36. Testing gene expression levels of Neurexin I in bees exhibiting high and low grooming behavior, J.M. Tsuruda1, S. Subramanyam1, M.E. Arechavaleta-Velasco2, K.I. Alcala-Escamilla2, C. Robles-Rios2, C.E. Williams1 , G.J. Hunt1. 1). Purdue University, 901 West State St., West Lafayette, IN, 2). Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP), Ajuchitlan, Qro. Mexico.

37. Division of labor shifts in response to age of brood in Apis mellifera.  K.S. Traynor1, Y. Le Conte2 and R.E. Page1, 1).  School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, AZ, 2). , Department of Bees & Environment, INRA, Avignon, France.

38。 Why do the best colonies have a high ratio of sealed to open brood? F.A. Eischen, F.A., R. H. Graham and R. Rivera. The Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, Tucson, AZ

Posters

  1. Evaluation of honey bee microbiome sensitivity to fungicides. Ann Bernert and Ramesh Sagili. Department of HorticultureOregon State University, Corvallis, OR.
  2. An inexpensive test for Nosema in honey bees. Martin A. Matisoff and Thomas C. Webster. College of Agriculture, Food Science and Sustainable Systems, Kentucky State University, Frankfort KY.
  3. High virulence of Nosema ceranae in Spain was not due to carbon dioxide anesthesia. Meghan O. Milbrath1, X.B. Xie1,2 and Z.Y. Huang1. 1) Department of Entomology, 243 Natural Science, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI, 2) Laboratory Animal Science Department, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China.
  4. Audible Cues to Stress in Honey Bee Colonies. Robert A. Seccomb, Colin B. Henderson, Jerry J. Bromenshenk. Bee Alert Technology, Inc.; Missoula, MT.
  5. Decimeter Resolution Mapping of Honey Bee Positions Using Portable Light Detecting and Ranging (LIDAR). Colin B. Henderson1, Robert A. Seccomb2, Rachel Dickson3, Jerry Bromenshenk4 1) Missoula College, Missoula, MT; 2) Bee Alert Technology, Inc.; 3) Big Sky High School; 4) Division of Biological Sciences, The University of MT, Missoula, MT.

 

 

 

 

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