Bee the Best!

Passion for Bees, Compassion for Beekeepers
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Bees are beautiful

Almost no other insects compare to its beauty. At least in Zach's eyes. You know why? Because he is a beeholder :)

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Bees are important

Bees pollinate almost $1 billion worth of crops per year in Michigan alone.

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Bees are sweet

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Bees produce honey, which is the earliest sweet humans used. Yet it actually protects your teeth!

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Bees are social

Honey bees have a society almost as complex as our own! They cooperate, have a voting process (for swarming), everyone is born equal (in terms of becoming a queen or worker), and send their soldiers to war...

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Bees are versatile

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Besides producing honey, it also produces beeswax, royal jelly, propolis and bee pollen...both royal jelly and propolis have antioxident, antitumor and antivirus properties.

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  • Flowering time

    Posted on May 28th, 2015 Zachary Huang No comments

    May 25. Black locust is blooming. This is a wonderful and very important honey plant in Michigan.  Another reason to get your package bees installed in April, not in May, to take better advantage of this plant. This year, however, has been cold and raining and our bees have not been build up as strong as I would liked — they should be having swarming cells now usually. No swarm calls so far this year, yet.

    May 23. Blueberry is blooming, as mentioned by Rufus Isaacs on facebook.

    May 17.  Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata, Elaeagnaceae) is blooming. Bees love it, but I was told the honey might be dark.I had a cover photo on American Bee Journal with a honey bee on this flower.

    May 13.  Red buds are in full bloom, i saw many bees foraging on an Asian species, but have seen ONLY bumble bees here. Dogwood, viburnum are also in bloom — I have yet to see honey bees on the large, white-flowered dogwood. . Apples in full bloom (they are a bit behind crab-apples?).  Dandelions have been for a long time.

    April 30. I noticed the Bradford Pear (Pyrus calleryana, Rosaceae) is in peak bloom at MSU campus (i.e. more than a week now) but the one behind my house still quiet. Likewise, the Nankin Cherries in campus has past peak bloom and the 2 at my yard is just beginning. Grape hyacinth (Muscari sp, Asparagaceae) is blooming at my house. I have shot bees on this flower before (see here).

    April 21.  Cherries, both Japanese cherries, Nanking cherries (Prunus tomentosa) and perhaps also the edible cherries, I assume, are starting to bloom. Red maple is basically done (started about 7 days ago). Forsythia has been blooming for about 4 days (I have seen a single bee foraging on it in Australia but a few more in Beijing, China), none in Michigan.  Lenten rose (Hellebore) also bloomed for a while, I had seen bees on this flower in NC but not here. Red maples are basically done blooming, Norway maple is starting to bloom. I have seen solitary bees foraging on this tree (and perhaps a honey bee finally this year! i have to inspect my photos to see if it is a honey bee a solitary bee).  Boxelder also blooming, I have seen bees in China foraging on this (and has some far away photos).

    April 17. Red maple is blooming, I saw some bees (a few looked like honey bees!).   Crocuses are basically done. Pussy willows are in peak bloom, lots of honeybees and native bees.

    April 6, Beal botanical gardens: I saw and photographed honey bees, parasitic wasps, and some solitary bees on: winter aconite, chionodoxa, anemone flowers, and Christmas rose.  Honey bees were also foraging on witchhazel (behind North Kezie), with yellow flowers and strong (but pleasant) odor. Only a few Schilla and did not see bees. Puchkinia not out yet, crocus (only one) was withering. Skunk cabbage was also blooming (only 2 flowers, so no bees) my last year’s photos of bees visiting them are here.)

    This post is linked to from http://bees.msu.edu/flowers and will be updated 1-2 times per every 2 weeks.